Posts tagged ‘Southeast Asia’

December 17, 2014

HRW: Lao government’s investigation into Sombath case ‘is a sham’

Human Rights

HRW: Lao government’s investigation into Sombath case ‘is a sham’

Two years ago, prominent activist Sombath Somphone vanished from the streets of the Lao capital Vientiane. Although the authorities could give answers, they have remained silent to this day, says HRW’s Phil Robertson.

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source: http://www.dw.de/hrw-lao-governments-investigation-into-sombath-case-is-a-sham/a-18129563

Laos Sombath Somphone Archivbild 2005

On the evening of December 15, 2012, civil society leader Sombath disappeared without a trace. He was on his way home from the office when he was pulled over at a police checkpoint. The rights activist was later taken to another vehicle and driven away. His whereabouts still remain unknown.

Right from the beginning, it is widely believed to be a case of enforced disappearance, with many suspecting the Southeast Asian nation’s Communist one-party government to be behind the abduction. The government, however, has so far firmly denied any responsibility for the incident. The Sombath case stirred an international outcry, with prominent figures like Hillary Clinton, John Kerry and Desmond Tutu calling for his safe return and urging the authorities not to block a thorough investigation.

Sombath had for decades campaigned for the rights of the land-locked nation’s poor rural population and the protection of environment. In 2005, he was awarded the Ramon Magsaysay Prize, considered Asia’s equivalent to the Nobel Prize. In a DW interview, Phil Robertson, Asia expert at Human Rights Watch, strongly criticizes the Lao government for their hard stance.

Phil Robertson Human Rights Watch

Robertson: ‘The authorities know far more than they are letting on’

DW: It has been two years since Sombath went missing. Are there any news concerning his whereabouts and his fate?

Phil Robertson: No, there’s been very little additional news about his whereabouts or what has happened to him. What we know is that Sombath was taken away as seen in the CCTV video of December 15, 2012, and there are reliable sources that said he was still in the custody of the authorities in Vientiane later that night, but then little more is known after that.

The Lao police’s investigation has been a complete joke so far. The authorities know far more than they are letting on, and it’s really become quite clear that the government’s investigation is a sham, designed to draw out the time and frustrate those demanding answers – presumably with the aim of getting them to finally give up and forget.

But two years on, we’re not going to forget, and we’re going to remain committed to supporting his wife, Shui-Meng Ng, and family, in their demands for answers. I’ve lost count of the number of offers of technical assistance by European and North American police forces to the Lao police for their investigation, but all of those offers have been refused.

As a recent report from the International Commission of Jurists shows, there are many lines of investigative inquiry to be pursued if the Lao government were interested in doing the sort of thorough investigation required by international human rights law – but instead, they are engaged in a cover-up, and a campaign of enforced silence in Vientiane to prevent anyone from saying more about Sombath.

The many governments providing development assistance to Laos should make a big issue of this and demand a real search for the truth of what has happened to Sombath.

From the very beginning, the Lao government has denied that it had anything to do with Sombath’s disappearance. Is there any chance that someone other the government is responsible for this?

​The Lao government has been lying from the top on down when it comes to the Sombath case. At the start of their inquiries, they freely admitted that the person pictured in the CCTV footage was Sombath – but now they are claiming that maybe it was not him. So if anything, the investigation is not making any progress. It’s rather going backwards.

Lately, Lao diplomats have been trying to peddle a new theory that Sombath’s work brought him into conflict with Thai mafia elements involved in Laos and that it was the Thais that did something to him. Of course, there is no evidence of that. This is yet another part of the officials’ ongoing effort to confuse and misinform, and desperately try to transfer blame to somewhere else other than the Lao government.

For the second anniversary of his disappearance, a group of legislators, civil society leaders and activists launched the so-called Sombath Initiative. What does this Initiative stand for?

What the Sombath Initiative stands for is an ongoing campaign for answers about what happened to Sombath. The initiative calls for justice for him and his family, and reminds his vision and work in participatory rural development. It will counter the effort by the Lao government to “buy time” with their bogus investigation and press people to forget. The Initiative will ensure that no one forgets the case.

Furthermore, it will also defend Sombath’s reputation and his work from the kind of scurrilous rumors that the Lao government is trying to spread to somehow discredit him.

Do you reckon that the new initiative could actually achieve something in order to solve the case and compel the government to start a thorough investigation?

​The Initiative will bring together all of Sombath’s friends, allies, and admirers from home and abroad to press the Lao government to change its views and start a real investigation into the enforced disappearance of Sombath.

The challenge in disappearance cases is always to sustain the interest and momentum of those who care against the efforts to cover up the truth. And often, these battles take years. We hope that it will not take that long to find out what has happened to Sombath, and ideally see him returned to his family, but the Sombath Intiative is built to sustain a campaign indefinitely until we get the answers we seek.

Vita Park

Sombath had for decades campaigned for the rights of the country’s poor rural population

What effect did the disappearance of Sombath have on others? What has changed since then?

An unprecedented chill has come over grass-roots villages and communities in Laos of the sort not seen since the early years after the Lao People’s Revolutionary Party took over in 1975 and started sending perceived opponents to ​brutal “re-education camps”.

The difference between then and now is the existence of various civil society groups and non-profit associations, led by many who received training and encouragement from Sombath and the Participatory Development Training Center (PADETC) that he founded.

Among these groups, there is now great fear and self-censorship because they see that if such a prominent civil society leader as Sombath can be taken, then no one is safe. So a wall of silence has descended in Vientiane. On the government side, only a few persons are authorized to give the standard government line and everyone else says nothing. On the civil society side, people are looking over their shoulders and are afraid of talking about Sombath.

Sombath has been missing for two years now. In your opinion, what are the chances that he is still alive?

I really don’t know, but we’re all hoping for the best. It’s hard to imagine that a man who has so selflessly contributed to his nation’s development and the well being of ordinary people should be considered an enemy to anyone. ​

Phil Robertson is deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Asia division.

June 24, 2014

Thai court takes villagers’ case against power firm, Laos dam

Photo: ศาลปกครองรับคำฟ้อง ชาวบ้านยื่นค้านสัญญาซื้อไฟเขื่อนไซยะบุรี</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>24 มิ.ย. ศาลปกครองนัดอ่านคำสั่งพิพาทระหว่างชาวบ้าน 37 คน ยื่นฟ้องการไฟฟ้าฝ่ายผลิตแห่งประเทศไทย (กฟผ.) คณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ กระทรวงพลังงาน กระทรวงทรัพยากรธรรมชาติและสิ่งแวดล้อม และคณะรัฐมนตรี กรณีการทำสัญญาซื้อไฟฟ้าของ กฟผ. จากเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ประเทศลาว ซึ่งอาจมีผลกระทบต่อทรัพยากรธรรมชาติและสิ่งแวดล้อมข้ามพรมแดนอย่างร้ายแรง หลังชาวบ้านยื่นคำอุทธรณ์คำสั่งของศาลปกครองชั้นต้น โดยมีชาวบ้านประมาณ 30 คน เข้าร่วมรับฟังคำสั่ง</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>โดยชาวบ้านยื่นฟ้อง 3 ข้อหา ข้อหาที่หนี่ง ได้แก่ มติของคณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ และคณะรัฐมนตรี ที่เห็นชอบตามข้อเสนอของกระทรวงพลังงาน ที่อนุญาตให้ กฟผ. ลงนามในสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด ของประเทศลาว ไม่ชอบด้วยกฎหมาย ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า การมีมติให้ทำสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าเป็นเพียงขั้นตอนการดำเนินการภายในของเจ้าหน้าที่รัฐเพื่อนำไปสู่การทำสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด จึงยังไม่มีผลทางกฎหมายออกสู่ภายนอกไปกระทบต่อสถานภาพของสิทธิหรือหน้าที่ของผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คน ดังนั้น ผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คนจึงไม่ใช่ผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนหรือเสียหายหรืออาจจะเดือดร้อนหรือเสียหายโดยมิอาจหลีกเลี่ยงได้</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p> ข้อหาที่สอง ได้แก่ สัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด ไม่ชอบด้วยกฎหมาย เนื่องจากไม่ปฏิบัติตามรัฐธรรมนูญ และฝ่าฝืนมติของคณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ และคณะรัฐมนตรี ที่กำหนดให้โครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรีต้องดำเนินการให้สอดคล้องกับความตกลงของแม่น้ำโขง พ.ศ. 2538 และต้องเปิดเผยข้อมูลต่อสาธารณชน ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คนมีความประสงค์อันแท้จริงคือ ต้องการให้ศาลปกครองมีคำบังคับให้เพิกถอนหรือยกเลิกสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>แต่ข้อเท็จจริงในสำนวนคดีไม่ปรากฏว่าผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คนเป็นคู่สัญญาตามสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้า ซึ่งเป็นสัญญาทางปกครอง จึงไม่มีข้อโต้แย้งเกี่ยวกับสัญญาทางปกครองที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จะมีสิทธิฟ้องคดีขอให้ศาลเพิกถอนสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าดังกล่าวได้ ดังนั้นผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จึงไม่ใช่ผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนหรือเสียหาย ที่จะมีสิทธิฟ้องคดีข้อหาที่สองต่อศาลปกครองได้ ตามมาตรา 42 วรรค 1 แห่งพ.ร.บ.จัดตั้งศาลปกครอง และวิธีพิจารณาคดีปกครอง พ.ศ. 2542 แม้ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน อุทธรณ์ว่า สัญญาซื้อไฟฟ้าก่อให้เกิดผลกระทบต่อผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ในฐานะที่เป็นผู้เสียภาษี และผู้รับประโยชน์จากสัญญา แต่ศาลเห็นว่า การเสียภาษีอากรถือว่าเป็นหน้าที่ที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จะต้องปฏิบัติตามที่กฎหมายบัญญัติไว้  </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>ข้อหาที่สาม ได้แก่ ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ฟ้องขอให้ศาลมีคำพิพากษาหรือคำสั่งให้ผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมาย และมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม การรับฟังความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง และการประเมินผลกระทบด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ สังคม ทั้งในฝ่ายไทยและประเทศเพื่อนบ้าน ซึ่งจะได้รับผลกระทบจากอันตรายข้ามพรมแดน ก่อนที่จะดำเนินการใดๆเกี่ยวกับการจัดซื้อไฟฟ้าโครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า ผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คน เป็นผู้มีส่วนได้เสียหรือได้รับผลกระทบโดยตรงและมากเป็นพิเศษกว่าบุคคลทั่วไปที่ไม่ได้อยู่อาศัยหรือประกอบอาชีพในพื้นที่ 8 จังหวัดริมแม่น้ำโขง จึงเป็นผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนเสียหายอย่างหลีกเลี่ยงไม่ได้ เนื่องจากการงดเว้นการกระทำของผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 และการแก้ไขหรือบรรเทาความเดือดร้อน  หรือเสียหาย ที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คนได้รับจำต้องมีคำบังคับโดยสั่งให้ผู้ถูกฟ้อดงคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมายและมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม รวมทั้งรับฟังความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง และประเมินผลกระทบด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ และสังคมตามคำขอของผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ตามมาตรา 72 วรรค 1(2) แห่งพ.ร.บ.จัดตั้งศาลปกครอง และวิธีพิจารณาคดีปกครอง พ.ศ. 2542</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>จึงมีคำสั่งแก้คำสั่งของศาลปกครองชั้นต้น เป็นให้รับคำฟ้องของผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน เฉพาะข้อหาที่ 3 ในส่วนที่ฟ้องขอให้ผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมาย และมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม การรับฟังความความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง การประเมินผลกระทบ ด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ และสังคม ไว้พิจารณา นอกจากที่แก้ให้เป็นไปตามคำสั่งของศาลชั้นต้น</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>http://www.khaosod.co.th/view_newsonline.php?newsid=TVRRd016WXdNREkyTVE9PQ==&subcatid=” width=”504″ height=”376″ /></a></p>
<p><img class=

 

ศาลปกครองรับคำฟ้อง ชาวบ้านยื่นค้านสัญญาซื้อไฟเขื่อนไซยะบุรี

24 มิ.ย. ศาลปกครองนัดอ่านคำสั่งพิพาทระหว่างชาวบ้าน 37 คน ยื่นฟ้องการไฟฟ้าฝ่ายผลิตแห่งประเทศไทย (กฟผ.) คณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ กระทรวงพลังงาน กระทรวงทรัพยากรธรรมชาติและสิ่งแวดล้อม และคณะรัฐมนตรี กรณีการทำสัญญาซื้อไฟฟ้าของ กฟผ. จากเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ประเทศลาว ซึ่งอาจมีผลกระทบต่อทรัพยากรธรรมชาติและสิ่งแวดล้อมข้ามพรมแดนอย่างร้ายแรง หลังชาวบ้านยื่นคำอุทธรณ์คำสั่งของศาลปกครองชั้นต้น โดยมีชาวบ้านประมาณ 30 คน เข้าร่วมรับฟังคำสั่ง

โดยชาวบ้านยื่นฟ้อง 3 ข้อหา ข้อหาที่หนี่ง ได้แก่ มติของคณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ และคณะรัฐมนตรี ที่เห็นชอบตามข้อเสนอของกระทรวงพลังงาน ที่อนุญาตให้ กฟผ. ลงนามในสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด ของประเทศลาว ไม่ชอบด้วยกฎหมาย ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า การมีมติให้ทำสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าเป็นเพียงขั้นตอนการดำเนินการภายในของเจ้า หน้าที่รัฐเพื่อนำไปสู่การทำสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด จึงยังไม่มีผลทางกฎหมายออกสู่ภายนอกไปกระทบต่อสถานภาพของสิทธิหรือหน้าที่ ของผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คน ดังนั้น ผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คนจึงไม่ใช่ผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนหรือเสียหายหรืออาจจะเดือดร้อนหรือเสีย หายโดยมิอาจหลีกเลี่ยงได้

ข้อหาที่สอง ได้แก่ สัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด ไม่ชอบด้วยกฎหมาย เนื่องจากไม่ปฏิบัติตามรัฐธรรมนูญ และฝ่าฝืนมติของคณะกรรมการนโยบายพลังงานแห่งชาติ และคณะรัฐมนตรี ที่กำหนดให้โครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรีต้องดำเนินการให้สอดคล้องกับความตกลงของ แม่น้ำโขง พ.ศ. 2538 และต้องเปิดเผยข้อมูลต่อสาธารณชน ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คนมีความประสงค์อันแท้จริงคือ ต้องการให้ศาลปกครองมีคำบังคับให้เพิกถอนหรือยกเลิกสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้า ระหว่าง กฟผ. กับบริษัทไซยะบุรี พาวเวอร์ จำกัด

แต่ข้อเท็จจริงในสำนวนคดีไม่ปรากฏว่าผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คนเป็นคู่สัญญาตามสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้า ซึ่งเป็นสัญญาทางปกครอง จึงไม่มีข้อโต้แย้งเกี่ยวกับสัญญาทางปกครองที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จะมีสิทธิฟ้องคดีขอให้ศาลเพิกถอนสัญญาซื้อขายไฟฟ้าดังกล่าวได้ ดังนั้นผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จึงไม่ใช่ผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนหรือเสียหาย ที่จะมีสิทธิฟ้องคดีข้อหาที่สองต่อศาลปกครองได้ ตามมาตรา 42 วรรค 1 แห่งพ.ร.บ.จัดตั้งศาลปกครอง และวิธีพิจารณาคดีปกครอง พ.ศ. 2542 แม้ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน อุทธรณ์ว่า สัญญาซื้อไฟฟ้าก่อให้เกิดผลกระทบต่อผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ในฐานะที่เป็นผู้เสียภาษี และผู้รับประโยชน์จากสัญญา แต่ศาลเห็นว่า การเสียภาษีอากรถือว่าเป็นหน้าที่ที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน จะต้องปฏิบัติตามที่กฎหมายบัญญัติไว้

ข้อหาที่สาม ได้แก่ ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ฟ้องขอให้ศาลมีคำพิพากษาหรือคำสั่งให้ผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมาย และมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม การรับฟังความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง และการประเมินผลกระทบด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ สังคม ทั้งในฝ่ายไทยและประเทศเพื่อนบ้าน ซึ่งจะได้รับผลกระทบจากอันตรายข้ามพรมแดน ก่อนที่จะดำเนินการใดๆเกี่ยวกับการจัดซื้อไฟฟ้าโครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ศาลพิเคราะห์แล้วเห็นว่า ผู้ฟ้องทั้ง 37 คน เป็นผู้มีส่วนได้เสียหรือได้รับผลกระทบโดยตรงและมากเป็นพิเศษกว่าบุคคลทั่ว ไปที่ไม่ได้อยู่อาศัยหรือประกอบอาชีพในพื้นที่ 8 จังหวัดริมแม่น้ำโขง จึงเป็นผู้ได้รับความเดือดร้อนเสียหายอย่างหลีกเลี่ยงไม่ได้ เนื่องจากการงดเว้นการกระทำของผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 และการแก้ไขหรือบรรเทาความเดือดร้อน หรือเสียหาย ที่ผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คนได้รับจำต้องมีคำบังคับโดยสั่งให้ผู้ถูกฟ้อดงคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมายและมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม รวมทั้งรับฟังความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง และประเมินผลกระทบด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ และสังคมตามคำขอของผู้ฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน ตามมาตรา 72 วรรค 1(2) แห่งพ.ร.บ.จัดตั้งศาลปกครอง และวิธีพิจารณาคดีปกครอง พ.ศ. 2542

จึงมีคำสั่งแก้คำสั่งของศาลปกครองชั้นต้น เป็นให้รับคำฟ้องของผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 37 คน เฉพาะข้อหาที่ 3 ในส่วนที่ฟ้องขอให้ผู้ถูกฟ้องคดีทั้ง 5 ปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามรัฐธรรมนูญ กฎหมาย และมติของรัฐบาล รวมทั้งการแจ้งข้อมูลและการเผยแพร่ข้อมูลอย่างเหมาะสม การรับฟังความความคิดเห็นอย่างเพียงพอและจริงจัง การประเมินผลกระทบ ด้านสิ่งแวดล้อม สุขภาพ และสังคม ไว้พิจารณา นอกจากที่แก้ให้เป็นไปตามคำสั่งของศาลชั้นต้น

http://www.khaosod.co.th/view_newsonline.php?newsid=TVRRd016WXdNREkyTVE9PQ%3D%3D&subcatid

หยุด เขื่อนไซยะบุรี(stop Xayaburi Dam)

—————

 

REUTERS _ EDITION - UK

 

Thai court takes villagers’ case against power firm, Laos dam

BANGKOK, Tue, Jun 24, 2014 | 9:44am BST

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source:  http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/06/24/thailand-laos-lawsuit-dam-idUKL4N0P51PN20140624

(Reuters) – A Thai court accepted a lawsuit against state-owned Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) and four other state bodies on Tuesday for agreeing to buy electricity from a $3.5 billion hydropower dam being built in neighbouring Laos.

The Xayaburi dam, which will be the first on the main stream of the Mekong River in Southeast Asia, is at the heart of landlocked Laos’s ambitions to supply power to the region, with Thailand set to buy around 95 percent of the electricity generated.

Activists say the project threatens the livelihood of tens of millions who depend on the river’s resources.

Villagers from Thai provinces near the Mekong petitioned the Administrative Court in 2012 to suspend a power purchasing agreement signed by EGAT and Laos’s Xayaburi Power Company Limited but the court ruled it had no jurisdiction to hear the case.

That decision was reversed on Tuesday when the Supreme Administrative Court sided with villagers, who are demanding full environmental and health impact assessments.

Shares in Thai builder CH Karnchang, the main contractor for the controversial dam, were down 3.1 percent at 0810 GMT after the decision.

“The villagers are hoping that with this case the court will suspend the power purchase agreement and in the meantime carry out a transboundary impact assessment and further consultations,” Ame Trandem, Southeast Asia programme director for the International Rivers group, told Reuters.

“Ultimately, if the court finds the purchase agreement was approved illegally, it could cancel the agreement altogether.”

In 2011, member states that make up the Mekong River Commission overseeing the river’s development, agreed to conduct further environmental impact assessments before construction proceeded. Laos went ahead with a groundbreaking ceremony in November 2012, signalling the formal start of construction.

Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia share the lower stretches of the 4,000 km (2,500 mile) Mekong. Vietnam and Cambodia have urged Laos to halt the dam’s construction pending further study. (Editing by Alan Raybould and Matt Driskill)

——

Court takes Laos dam case

  • Published: 24 Jun 2014 at 16.54
  • Online news:
  • Writer: Amy Sawitta Lefevre/Reuters

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source: http://www.bangkokpost.com/most-recent/417107/court-takes-villagers-case-against-dam

A court accepted a lawsuit against state-owned Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) and four other state bodies on Tuesday for agreeing to buy electricity from a $3.5-billion hydropower dam being built in neighbouring Laos. 

Villagers hold fish-shaped signs and placards while they pose for photographers at the Administrative Court in Bangkok on Tuesday. (Reuters photo)

The Xayaburi dam, which will be the first on the main stream of the Mekong River in Southeast Asia, is at the heart of landlocked Laos’s ambitions to supply power to the region, with Thailand set to buy around 95% of the electricity generated.

Activists say the project threatens the livelihood of tens of millions who depend on the river’s resources.

Villagers from Thai provinces near the Mekong petitioned the Administrative Court in 2012 to suspend a power purchasing agreement signed by Egat and Laos’s Xayaburi Power Co Ltd but the court ruled it had no jurisdiction to hear the case.

That decision was reversed on Tuesday when the Supreme Administrative Court sided with villagers, who are demanding full environmental and health impact assessments.

Shares of Ch. Karnchang, the main contractor for the controversial dam, were down 3.1% after the decision before rebounding to close at 22.20 baht, down 0.89% from Monday’s close.

“The villagers are hoping that with this case the court will suspend the power purchase agreement and in the meantime carry out a transboundary impact assessment and further consultations,” Ame Trandem, Southeast Asia programme director for the International Rivers group, told Reuters.

“Ultimately, if the court finds the purchase agreement was approved illegally, it could cancel the agreement altogether.”

In 2011, member states that make up the Mekong River Commission overseeing the river’s development, agreed to conduct further environmental impact assessments before construction proceeded. Laos went ahead with a groundbreaking ceremony in November 2012, signalling the formal start of construction.

Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia share the lower stretches of the 4,000km Mekong. Vietnam and Cambodia have urged Laos to halt the dam’s construction pending further study.

 

Photo: คดีดังกล่าวเป็นคดีเพื่อประโยชน์สาธารณะ ศาลจึงรับฟ้อง

 

 

April 9, 2014

Ho Chi Minh City: Mekong Summit Struggles to Halt Devastating Dams

 

Mekong Summit Struggles to Halt Devastating Dams

March 31, 2014

Laos seeks private investment for budget problems

 

Laos seeks private investment for budget problems

 

Laos has invited private investment in national road construction for the first time, media reports said on Monday, as it faces mounting budget problems. Picture:

Laos has invited private investment in national road construction for the first time, media reports said on Monday, as it faces mounting budget problems. Picture:

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source:  http://www.enca.com/money/laos-seeks-private-investment-budget-problems

November 22, 2013

Thailand’s War of Attrition

 

Thailand’s War of Attrition

As the government and opposition forces take to the streets, an exiled billionaire waits in the wings, and battle lines are drawn.

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source: http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/11/21/thailand_s_war_of_attrition?page=full

BY STEVE FINCH | NOVEMBER 21, 2013

BANGKOK — With his sister in office, a majority in the lower house, and billions in the bank, Thailand’s self-exiled former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra had every reason to feel confident he might soon return home. But an attempt by the ruling Pheu Thai party to ram a sweeping political amnesty through parliament has backfired. As the government he influences from overseas fights for survival, Thailand’s latest political crisis threatens longer-term damage to Thaksin’s support base. And it leaves him a long way from home.

Portrayed by the Shinawatras as an attempt to draw a line under nearly a decade of bruising political encounters, the amnesty bill would have cleared Thaksin of a two-year prison term for graft in absentia after his ouster by coup in 2006. Murder charges against Abhisit Vejjajiva, leader of the opposition Democrat Party, over his role in crushing Bangkok street protests by Thaksin supporters, known as “Red Shirts,” when he was prime minister in 2010 would also have been quashed.

“Should we reset and move on or should we continue to fight?” Thaksin said in a last-ditch attempt at convincing his opponents that the bill could lead to political reconciliation during an interview published in Thai and English on Oct. 24.

Eight days later, the Pheu Thai-dominated lower house unanimously passed the bill amid an opposition walkout. By the time it reached the upper house on Nov. 12, however, the bill had become so toxic that senators had little choice but to reject it 141-0.

As it reached the Senate, almost every corner of Thai society was livid. Office workers in the central Silom district of Bangkok left their desks and poured into the street blowing whistles; university staff and students marched together on campuses, and opposition supporters set up tents around the capital’s Democracy Monument near the seat of government.

A bill that was designed to “reset” the country’s long-running political feud by clearing everyone’s name thereby — in theory, keeping everyone happy — had achieved the opposite. For Thaksin supporters, many of whom were killed and injured at the hands of the military in 2010, the amnesty would clear main opposition Democrat Party leader Abhisit, a man they commonly refer to as “the murderer.” For his opponents, the bill is seen as a cynical attempt by the government to sweep graft under the carpet and smooth the return of a hated and divisive figure. There are also fears that Thaksin’s assets worth $1.47 billion could be unfrozen.

Following a coup in September 2006, Thailand’s political divide has widened in a cyclical series of political crises typified by protests and clashes involving the “Yellow Shirts,” self-proclaimed defenders of the monarchy, and the Red Shirts, opponents of the coup. As a result, chaos has become a regular feature of life in the Thai capital: In November 2008, Yellow Shirts seized both Bangkok airports to protest a new government deemed a proxy of Thaksin; less than two years later, parts of Bangkok were turned into free-fire zones as the army clashed with encamped Red Shirts. Amid the battles, the Reds have aimed to overturn the constitutional legacy of the coup in the name of greater democratic reform. For the Yellows, the goal remains the end of Thaksin’s influence, a man deemed a threat to the monarchy, an enduring symbol of graft and greed.

“Corruption is the No. 1 problem with the government,” says Chao Chaonarich, a real-estate agent from Bangkok. One of the thousands of Yellow Shirt protesters who continue to rally in Bangkok as the opposition aims to topple Yingluck, Chao complained the government’s record was far from stellar even before the amnesty bill.

Government critics argue that a populist rice-pledging scheme which guarantees farmers a fixed price per kilo is costing the country dear, guaranteeing prices above market rates while sapping overseas demand. The Shinawatras have pursued an election-winning strategy of “Thaksinomics,” playing to the rural poor — the majority — by providing subsidies on everything from health insurance to energy in recent years, with mixed results. The rice-pledging scheme left taxpayers with a bill for 136 billion baht ($4.3 billion) during Yingluck’s first year in office and an estimated $9.6 billion in the 18 months since. The government has refused to disclose recent losses but the state budget is hemorrhaging funds by most accounts: In recent weeks, some farmers have been told they must wait months before they will receive payment with debt as percentage of GDP climbing to 44.3 percent.

To add further damage to the Pheu Thai government, the International Monetary Fund called for the rice policy to be scrapped on Nov. 11. That was the same day the Senate shot down the amnesty bill and the International Court of Justice in The Hague mostly sided with Cambodia in a ruling on a territorial dispute over land around Preah Vihear, a 1,000-year-old Hindu temple.

If policies like the rice scheme were supposed to lock-in voters for Yingluck and Thaksin in Thailand’s agricultural heartland in the north, the amnesty debacle has mobilized opponents, particularly in Bangkok, while turning off rural supporters.

A Bangkok University poll conducted a few days before the Senate killed the bill put opposition leader Abhisit ahead of Yingluck for the first time since she easily defeated him in June 2011 elections. Her approval rating has slumped to 26.7 percent against 37.2 percent for Abhisit — in June of this year, Yingluck was nearly nine percentage points clear according to the same pollsters.

Her policies have remained strictly Thaksin-centric: Economically with the rice policy and a first-time car-buyers financing scheme, and politically in attempting to nullify constitutional changes made following the coup against her exiled brother.

Thida Thavornseth, chairman of the United Front for Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD), a core Red Shirt group, estimated the government had lost “at least 10 percent” of its support in the past few weeks. Key supporters who want to see rule of law, democratic reform, and Abhisit on trial for murder are “angry” she says.

Thida was among four key Red Shirt leaders were removed from a scheduled appearance on Asia Update, a television channel financially backed by Thaksin’s son Panthongtae, a week before the crucial Senate vote. Their message wasn’t what Thaksin wanted people to hear, she said: All were against the bill. In response, the UDD is set to launch its own TV channel next month.

Other former Thaksin supporters have spoken of more drastic moves away from him, and his sister. Among the Red Shirt protests against the amnesty bill, some leaders of the movement spoke of setting up a political party to rival the Shinawatras.

“Many people don’t feel the same about Yingluck and Thaksin anymore,” says Thida.

An increasingly fractured group, the Red Shirts represent a number of factions who all share one thing in common: Since his first election victory in 2001, most have jumped on the Thaksin bandwagon. In a country where King Bhumibol Adulyadej has reigned from behind closely guarded palace gates since 1946 (the longest-serving monarch in the world), the Red Shirts have considered Thaksin a breath of fresh, democratic air to mix up the old elite. To his detractors, the telecoms billionaire-cum-politician has instead been viewed as nouveau-riche, a young upstart prepared to upset the regal status quo to his own end.

He hinted at reforming what is known as Article 112, Thailand’s draconian lese majeste law; so too did his sister when she took office. But with an escalating number of Red Shirts behind bars in recent years, “Pheu Thai has been singularly unresponsive in the effort to bring up this issue,” says David Streckfuss, a leading academic on lese majeste. The controversial amnesty bill was described as a “blanket amnesty” by most news media for everyone from Thaksin down to the lowest-ranking Red Shirt behind bars. But the only Thais who wouldn’t get a clean slate under the proposed law were those behind bars on lese majeste convictions, says Streckfuss.

With antagonism running high and the number of cases rising to about 150 every year, Article 112 is for the time being too politically explosive for the government to handle in the current political climate, adds Streckfuss.

In a country where this draconian law makes free political discussion impossible, Thailand’s latest political quagmire has raised even more questions than usual as the impasse rumbles on. Why did Thaksin risk such a disastrous political move? And where does it leave supporters who have for the first time openly protested in the streets against him?

Mutterings of a back-room deal between Thaksin, the military, and even the “network monarchy” (the royals and their associated offices including the Privy Council) provide a plausible explanation as to why Thaksin felt confident enough to push the amnesty bill so hard from exile through his supporters. But we don’t know what’s happening behind the scenes, says Duncan McCargo, author of The Thaksinization of Thailand.

“The amnesty issue relates to what the state of play is over a deal between the two sides,” he says. “It’s not simply about what Thaksin is doing.”

Audio tapes of a supposed conversation appeared on YouTube in which Thaksin discussed a military reshuffle and his possible return to Thailand with Deputy Defense Minister Yuthasak Sasiprapha emerged in July fueling conspiracy theories over a backroom deal. Yuthasak’s roles in previous Thaksin administrations added an appearance of authenticity.

But those close to the billionaire tycoon in recent years — including exiled UDD founding member Jakrapob Penkair — remain adamant that he was not party to any discussions with the military, opposition or any other senior establishment figure in the lead up to the amnesty bill.

“There’s no such deal. But I admit that there might be some deal among those in high places in Thailand that our side is not involved in,” says Jarapob, alluding to a deal among other power factions.

As leaders of the opposition Democrat party appeared on stage in front of thousands of supporters in Bangkok during a final push to topple the government this week, Yingluck has called for talks with the opposition. It’s the first public mention of dialogue since Thailand’s latest political battle began.

The “unpalatable” opposition is resurgent but cannot expect to win an election anytime soon, says McCargo. With Thaksin recoiled and no closer to a return, his position has weakened. And although Yingluck remains vulnerable in the short term and far from in full control, she is likely to emerge further distanced from her divisive older brother and therefore stronger, adds McCargo.

Thailand, though, remains no closer to a settlement, much less in possession of a leader to help end the cycle of mutually assured political destruction.

“For Thai people, you don’t have any other choice,” says Thida of the UDD. “If you don’t choose Pheu Thai, but you support democracy, who do you choose now?”

—-

สื่ออินโดฯถาม’ทักษิณ’ไม่ผิดแล้วหนีทำไม

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source: http://news.th.msn.com/inter/%E0%B8%AA%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%99%E0%B9%82%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%AF%E0%B8%96%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A1%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B1%E0%B8%81%E0%B8%A9%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%93%E0%B9%84%E0%B8%A1%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%9C%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%94%E0%B9%81%E0%B8%A5%E0%B9%89%E0%B8%A7%E0%B8%AB%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%B5%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B3%E0%B9%84%E0%B8%A1?fb_action_ids=754653134549085&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_ref=scpshrjwfb&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=[248163105333998]&action_type_map=[%22og.likes%22]&action_ref_map=[%22scpshrjwfb%22]

บทความสื่ออินโดฯ ถาม

“ทักษิณ” มั่นใจว่าไม่ผิด ทำไมไม่สู้คดี เหน็บ “ยิ่งลักษณ์” เดินเกมผิด หรือไร้เดียงสา เร่งช่วยพี่ชายจนถูกต้านเกือบล้มทั้งกระดาน

จาการ์ตา โพสต์ สื่อดังของอินโดนีเซีย เล่นแรง เขียนบทบรรณาธิการชื่อ “A dangerous sister’s love”
โดยระบุว่า น.ส.ยิ่งลักษณ์ ชินวัตร นายกรัฐมนตรีของไทย เดินเกมผิดพลาด หรือ ไร้เดียงสา จากการพยายาม
หาทางช่วยพี่ชาย (พ.ต.ท.ทักษิณ ชินวัตร) กลับประเทศ ในเวลานี้ ด้วยการออกกฎหมายนิรโทษกรรม จนนำมา
ซึ่งการประท้วงต่อต้านครั้งรุนแรงตามท้องถนน

บทบรรณาธิการของจาการ์ตา โพสต์ ระบุด้วยว่า “ยิ่งลักษณ์” อาจจะต้องจ่ายค่าตอบแทนของบทเรียนราคา
ที่สูงลิ่ว จากความผิดพลาดในครั้งนี้ แม้ว่ากองทัพ ซึ่งมีประวัติศาสตร์อันยาวนานในการขับไล่รัฐบาลที่มาจาก
การเลือกตั้งยังคงนิ่งเฉยในเรื่องดังกล่าว แต่ก็จะประมาทไม่ได้ เพราะครั้งก่อน กองทัพ เคยใช้ข้ออ้างเรื่อง
ความมั่นคงในการปฏิวัติ “ทักษิณ” มาแล้ว และซ้ำร้าย จะยิ่งไปกันใหญ่ หากทหารได้รับอนุญาต อีกครั้ง เพื่อ
ฆ่าประชาธิปไตย ในนามของการรักษาความปลอดภัย และความมั่นคง เหมือนปี 2010 ที่ทหาร ปราบปรามผู้
สนับสนุนของ “ทักษิณ” จนมีผู้เสีนชีวิตกว่า 90 ราย

จาการ์ตาร์โพส ยังระบุอีกด้วยว่า “ทักษิณ” คือต้นเหตุความแตกแยกในประเทศไทย ได้รับความนิยมสูงจาก
เกษตรกร และประชาชนในชนบท แต่เป็นศัตรูหมายเลข 1 ของชนชั้นกลาง ในเขตเมือง ชนชั้นสูง ทางการ
เมือง ทหาร และที่สำคัญที่สุดคือ พระราชวงศ์ ถูกตัดสินว่ามีความผิดข้อหาคอร์รัปชั่น ต้องติดคุก 2 ปี และ
ยึดทรัพย์จำนวนมาก ซึ่งจากความผิดดังกล่าว ทำให้น้องสาวต้องออกกฎหมายนิรโทษกรรม จนนำมาซึ่งความ
วุ่นวายจนต้องยอมถอย และถอนกฎหมายออกจากสภา แต่ผู้ประท้วงยังไม่ยอมหยุด แม้ว่า “ยิ่งลักษณ์” จะ
ร้องขอให้ยุติการชุมนุมก็ตาม

ทั้งนี้ บทบรรณาธิการของจาการ์ตา โพสต์ ทิ้งท้ายว่า ทักษิณ อาจจะไม่สามารถกลับมาเหยียบประเทศไทยได้
อีกครั้ง แม้ว่าขณะนี้จะเป็นนายกรัฐมนตรีโดยพฤตินัยก็ตาม จึงตั้งคำถามกลับไปว่าหาก “ทักษิณ” มีความมั่นใจ
ในความบริสุทธิ์ของตน ทำไมไม่เผชิญหน้ากับความยุติธรรมโดยตรง และคำถามนี้ “ทักษิณ” เพียงคนเดียวที่
สามารถตอบได้

THE JAKARTA POST
Editorial: A Dangerous Sister’s Love

The Jakarta Post

Click on the link to get more news and video from original source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2013/11/14/editorial-a-dangerous-sister-s-love.html

Read the Jakarta Post’s Editorial of November 14 inside

JAKARTA: — Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, wrongly or naively, assumed that time has come for her government to welcome back elder brother Thaksin Shinawatra. Her intention to grant amnesty to Thaksin backfired, as evident from the massive protests waged by anti-Thaksin groups and even by many of the former prime minister’s supporters.

Yingluck and the country may have to pay dearly for her wrong calculation and over-confidence.

So far the military, which has a long history of ousting democraticaly elected governments, has remained quiet about the political uproar. But knowing their resentment with Thaksin, it is just a matter of time before the army generals use this “national security threat” as a pretext to stage a coup.

It would be a nightmare for the whole nation if the military was allowed, again, to kill democracy in the name of security and stability. In 2010, a military crackdown on Thaksin’s supporters resulted in 90 protesters being killed.

Thaksin is a divisive figure in Thailand. He is highly popular among farmers and people in the countryside, but he is the public enemy No. 1 for middle class in urban areas, political elites, the military and most importantly, the royal family. He was sentenced to two years in prison for corruption in 2006 and many of the multi-billionaire’s assets were seized.

Yingluck’s Puea Thai Party backed off from the amnesty bill on Monday, but the main opposition Democrat Party seized the opportunity and gained the momentum to organize a three-day nationwide strike starting Wednesday. The prime minister realized her mistake and called on protesters to back down too.

“I would like to ask the people to call off the protests,” Yingluck appealed to the nation on Tuesday. “I am pleading for [protesters] to have patience. We don’t want to see any violence.”

According to the Associated Press, the original draft of the bill did not extend amnesty to the leaders of either the pro or anti-Thaksin groups, but a House committee in mid-October suddenly changed the bill to include both. The last-minute change led to criticism that it was planned all along to include Thaksin.

Thaksin probably will never be able to return to Thailand again, although he is now a de facto prime minister of Thailand.


— The Nation 2013-11-15

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 581 other followers

%d bloggers like this: