Posts tagged ‘Religion’

July 11, 2015

Nationalism is Thailand’s true religion

Opinion

Nationalism is Thailand’s true religion

3 Jun 2015 at 03:30.

NEWSPAPER SECTION: NEWS | WRITER: SANITSUDA EKACHAI

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For the past month, Thai society has been in agreement that it’s only right to push the desperate Muslim Rohingya and Bangladeshi boat people back out to sea and let fate take care of them.

On Monday, lighted candles and solemn prayers filled temples nationwide as devotees promised to follow the Buddha’s path to celebrate Visakha Bucha Day. The world is perplexed. How could a country which prides itself as the hub of Buddhism be so cruel?

Every time Thailand hits world headlines – be it because of forced or child prostitution, slave labour, human trafficking, or political violence – the world asks: how could a Buddhist country commit such crimes?

My first reaction is to label the question simplistic. Isn’t it too easy to link one’s professed faith with their actions? Besides, all religions, not only Buddhism, teach love and compassion. And look how people are killing each other in the name of religion.

It’s also a major misunderstanding to think religious people cannot commit violence. The truth is, the more righteous people are, the more likely they are to choose violence as a way to eliminate what they see as sinful. The more religious fervour, the more violence. Examples abound, both here and abroad.

How many Thai Buddhists react to this question is interesting. Here are some reactions:

Why call us inhumane? We’re already housing more than 100,000 displaced people fleeing wars from Myanmar. Now it’s time for you to show your humanity by taking in these boat people; Thailand has limited resources.

We are kind; that’s why we provide them with food and water to help them go where they really want to go because Thailand is not their destination. Isn’t that enough? We are kind, but we cannot shoulder the long-term social problems immigrants bring.

Kindness or the lack of it is not the issue. The boat people influx is not of our making. It’s the legacy of Western colonialism’s divide-and-rule policy. The West must take responsibility.

Why help people who can afford to pay human smugglers to make money overseas?

We are kind, but Muslims are aggressive and have too many kids. They are national security threats who will aggravate problems in the deep South.

We have compassion, but we cannot help everyone suffering in this world. When we cannot help, we must practise Buddhism by using the principle of ubekkha, or equanimity.

Of these responses which are mere efforts to legitimise one’s cold-heartedness, I find the last one the most exasperating.

Fear fuelled by prejudice often drives people to make cruel choices. Life is full of difficult dilemmas; we all know that. We may not agree with that choice, but we can understand it. But to say your inhumanity is backed by the Buddha so that you can still feel good about yourself is, for me, hypocrisy and cruelty in the extreme. It’s also an outright abuse of the Buddha’s teaching.

To the question of why a Buddhist country is full of vices prohibited in Buddhism, may I offer an answer? It’s because we are not really Buddhists. Our predominant creed is nationalism. Racist nationalism to be exact, since our “Thainess” is based on the myth of the pure Thai race. That’s why it’s so easy for many of us to turn a blind eye to the suffering of other ethnicities and races – be they migrant workers, boat people, or Malay Muslims in the restive South.

Another creed we extol is patriarchy and sexism. It’s why the sex industry prospers, polygamy is culturally endorsed, violence against is women widespread, and gender prejudice is unquestioned.

Thai Theravada Buddhism, meanwhile, is fully operating under Thai nationalism and patriarchy. That’s why the clergy is fiercely against female ordination and remains silent amid the boat people crisis.

Buddhism may appear to be the dominant faith here, but widespread temple corruption has severely eroded public faith. The monkhood has been reduced to a social ladder for rural lads. Monks operate mainly as postmen, sending merit to our deceased relatives. Tucked in the comfortable cocoon of luxury and privilege, the feudal clergy has lost touch with the modern world and is too weak to provide a moral compass. There’s no need to look up the Buddhist canon to see if we’re true to our faith. Look at how we treat those weaker than us; that is the true reflection of our hearts.

South. Another creed we extol is patriarchy and sexism. It’s why the sex industry prospers, polygamy is culturally endorsed, violence against is women widespread, and gender prejudice is unquestioned. Thai Theravada Buddhism, meanwhile, is fully operating under Thai nationalism and patriarchy. That’s why the clergy is fiercely against female ordination and remains silent amid the boat people crisis.

Buddhism may appear to be the dominant faith here, but widespread temple corruption has severely eroded public faith. The monkhood has been reduced to a social ladder for rural lads. Monks operate mainly as postmen, sending merit to our deceased relatives. Tucked in the comfortable cocoon of luxury and privilege, the feudal clergy has lost touch with the modern world and is too weak to provide a moral compass.

There’s no need to look up the Buddhist canon to see if we’re true to our faith. Look at how we treat those weaker than us; that is the true reflection of our hearts.

Sanitsuda Ekachai is editorial pages editor, Bangkok Post.

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Comments:

  1. Khun Sanitsuda, I am considered very privileged to be able to read and understand fully what you have written. Do you have any plan to spread this message across our country in Thai? I feel that every Thai in this country also need to read and understand what is happening.
  2. Khun Sanitsuda, since most of us westerners already know this (wonderfully written piece by the way) THIS should be printed in ‘Thai’ newspapers! It’s your own people who needs this wake up call. I’d hate to see this great article go to waste for us, when we already know this. Send it off to all the nationalists of whom you mention. THEY are the ones who need to read this. But then again, Thais are infamous for never being able to accept the truth, so sadly, it’ll fall on deaf ears, I’m sure.
  3. The Dalai Lama has tried for over 12 years to get Theravada Buddhism removed from the World Buddhist Council because it promotes personality cult and the pursuit of personal wealth instead of following the true Buddhist creed. This would mean Thailand, Taiwan and Sri Lanka going it alone; seems the Council do not want to lose so many members (so much for them then).

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September 21, 2012

Restrictions on Religion Are Tightening, Study Finds

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Published: September 20, 2012

DAKAR, Senegal — Government restrictions on religion around the world were highest in the Middle East and North Africa, particularly in the period before the Arab Spring uprisings, a new study has found, underscoring a factor that fueled hostilities in the region and led to the rise of political Islam after the revolts.

The study, by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion and Public Life, said that in 2010 government restrictions on religion were “high or very high” in most of the Arab Spring countries, where suppression of Islamist movements contributed to the uprisings and spurred subsequent incursions of Islamists into political power.

Restrictions in Tunisia went from “high” in mid-2009 to “very high” a year later, the study found. The uprising there began at the end of 2011.

In Egypt, restrictions were already high and edged up further between 2009 and 2010, the year before the country exploded. And in Yemen, where there also was an uprising, restrictions increased sharply over the same period.

Over all, the study found a worldwide rise in religious restrictions. It measured two basic yardsticks: a government restrictions index, and a social hostilities index. Government restrictions include moves by authorities to ban faiths and conversions, and to limit preaching. Social hostilities encompass mob violence and “religion-related intimidation or abuse,” such as harassment over attire.

The study found 15 countries with very high levels of social hostilities in 2010, up from 10 in 2007, with the new additions being Egypt, Nigeria, the Palestinian territories, Russia and Yemen. It noted that “in Nigeria, violence between Christian and Muslim communities, including a series of deadly attacks, escalated throughout the period.”

However, in Nigeria at least, the religious dimension is often superseded by, or a mask for, more complex underlying factors — elements not noted by the broad-brush, numbers-based Pew study. In the central region of Nigeria, for instance, where much of the ostensibly Christian-Muslim violence takes place, the mutually hostile groups are often motivated as much by disputes over land and longstanding ethnic friction as they are by religion.

The study found that increases in religious restrictions outnumbered decreases in all five major regions of the world, with sub-Saharan Africa scoring the largest share of countries with significant increases.

Over all, countries with “high or very high restrictions” rose from 31 percent of the total in 2009 to 37 percent in 2010. The Pew study found that 63 percent of countries had “increases in government restrictions” from 2009 to 2010.

Separately on Thursday, United Nations human rights investigators in Geneva said that more than 300 Christians had been arrested since mid-2010 in Iran, where, they said, churches operate in a “climate of fear.” Iran is given a score of “very high” on Pew’s Government Restrictions Index.

The Pew study found that restrictions also increased in Europe, like the Swiss ban on construction of minarets, and in the United States, noting a rising number of instances in which people were prevented from wearing clothing or beards, and problems in building places of worship.

A version of this article appeared in print on September 21, 2012, on page A7 of the New York edition with the headline: Curbs Found Tightening On Religion.

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